Description

A whole horse approach to equine hoof health in the Top of the South.

*Barefoot Trimmer *Nutritionist

Closed
Open hours today: By appointment only
  • Monday

    Open 24h

  • Tuesday

    Open 24h

  • Wednesday

    Open 24h

  • Thursday

    Open 24h

  • Friday

    Open 24h

  • Saturday

    By appointment only

  • Sunday

    By appointment only

  • January 25, 2020 12:35 am local time

Services

Barefoot maintenance trims

Rehabilitative trimming

Nutrition advice

Balanced Equine mineral mixes

Laminitis prevention and rehabilitation

Qualifications

Australian Certified Equine Hoof Practitioners trainee

Telford Certificate in Equestrian Knowledge level 3

NZPCA D certificate coaching

Location
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1 week ago

Holistic Hoof Care NZ

We care about your horses.

As hoofcare providers, we see your horses a lot. Sometimes more than we see our own friends. Our clients, two and four-legged, become like family. And when we have a horse that's struggling soundness wise, I guarantee you, WE are struggling too. We want to help them, see them moving better and more comfortably, and we keep going over the details to see what we can do to help.

This is why we might ask you a lot of seemingly "pointless" questions. How old is your horse, again? What are they eating? Where are they turned out? Are you riding? Are they better on hard ground or soft? Any recent vaccines?

We watch how each limb is landing. We notice how they shift their weight when we pick up a leg. We feel when they don't want to stand on a certain limb for too long. We watch their posture change (or not change) as a result of what we do to the feet. We pay attention. We want to notice a positive difference.

When we have a tough day, after seeing a tough case, I can assure you, there are times when before we've even buckled our seatbelts to leave your property, we are messaging our colleagues about it. Because we care.

We LOVE getting texts of success stories with a horse we work on, because sometimes that's just what we need to hear after leaving a difficult case. We are rooting for your horses. We want to celebrate with you.

We love being a part of your horse's team. We love working with your vets at appointments, working towards finding solutions. We welcome collaboration because we want to help you succeed, and we want to see your horse improve.

We care. Don't think for a minute that we aren't trying our best to put the puzzle pieces together to get your horse comfortable.
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4 weeks ago

Holistic Hoof Care NZ

It's hot out there! Our practitioners are out there in all sorts of weather conditions, and summer can provide some extra challenges. There are some things clients can do to help, but we don't recommend anyone works in extreme heat. Stay safe everyone! ☀️ ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Holistic Hoof Care NZ

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Comment on Facebook

Naw our beautiful boy ‘Pride’ ❤️ Charlotte is a star 🌟 we could not even catch him let alone touch him when he arrived, hard to believe. Now he adores Charlotte and she has gained his trust to trim his feet from dinner plates to a lovely set of healthy trimmed feet 😊👌🏻❤️

Spud want's to know when your bringing ice cream again. 😋

2 months ago

Holistic Hoof Care NZ

An awesome example of how you can increase your horse's movement every day. If your horse is an easy keeper or you'd just like him/her to retain some fitness, a track system if definitely worth considering. ... See MoreSee Less

An awesome example of how you can increase your horses movement every day. If your horse is an easy keeper or youd just like him/her to retain some fitness, a track system if definitely worth considering.

3 months ago

Holistic Hoof Care NZ

CAUSES AND PREVENTION
Part 2 of the Spring Laminitis series

While there are many causes of laminitis, sugar related laminitis demands attention at this time of year. Here I’ll be discussing how to keep your horse safe this spring.

Spring grass causes laminitis when;
- The horse consistently consumes more sugar and starch than his/her body can safely handle
- The horse gets a sudden spike in sugar and starch that overloads the system
- Energy consumed is far more than energy expended
- Hormones are out of balance causing one of the above (e.g. insulin resistance and Cushing’s disease)

Overweight horses are particularly at risk but underweight and ideal horses can still be affected by sugars.

The key points of prevention are…
☆Weight watching!
☆Feeding fibre!
☆Maximising movement!

FEEDING. The key to safe feeding for laminitis prevention is not to starve the horse, but to give them a high fibre diet with a sugar and starch level they can handle. When the sugar and starch levels in the grass go up you may have to make some changes.
• Decrease grain based feeds while the grass is rich. Unless your horse is a poor doer or in strenuous work he/she likely won’t need much, if any, extra hard feed.
• Replace grass with hay. If your horse is on very little hard feed and is still a chub, consider swapping some of the grass in their diet with hay.
• Slow consumption using slow feeder hay nets or a grazing muzzle.
• Turn out at strategic times. Sugar levels in the grass are lowest first thing in the morning and highest in the late afternoon. If your horse gets limited turnout do it in the morning.
• Introduce new grass gradually to avoid overloading your horse’s system.

MOVEMENT. Exercise not only uses up the sugars your horse consumes, it positively affects the hormones that control how the body handles sugars. It also benefits a horse’s overall health in many ways. A little movement goes a long way!
• Ride more! Make your rides a little longer or more frequent
• Hand walk your horse. If your horse can’t be ridden you could still consider taking him/her for a walk sometimes. It’s an awesome bonding exercise and will benefit your fitness too!
• Paddock your horse in a herd. Even one extra horse in the paddock has been shown to significantly increase the amount a horse moves throughout the day.
• Get smart. Position hay at the opposite end of the paddock to water. Run a strip of temporary fencing through the middle of your paddock with a gap at the end (making the paddock ‘U’ shaped) so your horse has to travel further to get from one side to the other. Put toys in the paddock like a hoof ball to get your horse more active. Be creative!
• Create a track system. Paddocking horses on a continuous track rather than a square field has been shown to significantly increase movement.

WEIGHT. Keeping your horse within a healthy weight range massively reduces their risk of getting laminitis and other health issues.
• Neck should have little to no fatty crest
• Ribs should be easy to feel but hard see
• Bum should be nicely rounded but not apple or ‘McDonald’s M’ shaped
• Topline should be filled out without the back becoming a ‘table top’
• Use a weight tape to track your horse’s weight gain or loss

Note!
~ Make all changes to feed or exercise slowly!
~ Don’t starve your horse! Equines need an almost constant supply of fibre to keep their gut functioning correctly. Ensure they have plenty of food, whether that’s soaked hay or fresh grass depending on your horse’s needs.
~ Keep on a regular hoof care schedule! Your farrier or trimmer will keep the mechanical forces of each hoof correct, and they may notice changes in the hoof before you do.

Part 3 will cover how to tell if your horse has laminitis and how to respond in an emergency 🐎
... See MoreSee Less

CAUSES AND PREVENTION 
Part 2 of the Spring Laminitis series

While there are many causes of laminitis, sugar related laminitis demands attention at this time of year. Here I’ll be discussing how to keep your horse safe this spring. 

Spring grass causes laminitis when;
- The horse consistently consumes more sugar and starch than his/her body can safely handle
- The horse gets a sudden spike in sugar and starch that overloads the system 
- Energy consumed is far more than energy expended
- Hormones are out of balance causing one of the above (e.g. insulin resistance and Cushing’s disease) 

Overweight horses are particularly at risk but underweight and ideal horses can still be affected by sugars. 

The key points of prevention are… 
☆Weight watching! 
☆Feeding fibre! 
☆Maximising movement!

FEEDING. The key to safe feeding for laminitis prevention is not to starve the horse, but to give them a high fibre diet with a sugar and starch level they can handle. When the sugar and starch levels in the grass go up you may have to make some changes. 
• Decrease grain based feeds while the grass is rich. Unless your horse is a poor doer or in strenuous work he/she likely won’t need much, if any, extra hard feed. 
• Replace grass with hay. If your horse is on very little hard feed and is still a chub, consider swapping some of the grass in their diet with hay. 
• Slow consumption using slow feeder hay nets or a grazing muzzle. 
• Turn out at strategic times. Sugar levels in the grass are lowest first thing in the morning and highest in the late afternoon. If your horse gets limited turnout do it in the morning. 
• Introduce new grass gradually to avoid overloading your horse’s system. 

MOVEMENT. Exercise not only uses up the sugars your horse consumes, it positively affects the hormones that control how the body handles sugars. It also benefits a horse’s overall health in many ways. A little movement goes a long way!
• Ride more! Make your rides a little longer or more frequent
• Hand walk your horse. If your horse can’t be ridden you could still consider taking him/her for a walk sometimes. It’s an awesome bonding exercise and will benefit your fitness too!
• Paddock your horse in a herd. Even one extra horse in the paddock has been shown to significantly increase the amount a horse moves throughout the day. 
• Get smart. Position hay at the opposite end of the paddock to water. Run a strip of temporary fencing through the middle of your paddock with a gap at the end (making the paddock ‘U’ shaped) so your horse has to travel further to get from one side to the other. Put toys in the paddock like a hoof ball to get your horse more active. Be creative!
• Create a track system. Paddocking horses on a continuous track rather than a square field has been shown to significantly increase movement. 

WEIGHT. Keeping your horse within a healthy weight range massively reduces their risk of getting laminitis and other health issues. 
• Neck should have little to no fatty crest 
• Ribs should be easy to feel but hard see
• Bum should be nicely rounded but not apple or ‘McDonald’s M’ shaped
• Topline should be filled out without the back becoming a ‘table top’ 
• Use a weight tape to track your horse’s weight gain or loss 

Note!
~ Make all changes to feed or exercise slowly!
~ Don’t starve your horse! Equines need an almost constant supply of fibre to keep their gut functioning correctly. Ensure they have plenty of food, whether that’s soaked hay or fresh grass depending on your horse’s needs. 
~ Keep on a regular hoof care schedule! Your farrier or trimmer will keep the mechanical forces of each hoof correct, and they may notice changes in the hoof before you do. 

Part 3 will cover how to tell if your horse has laminitis and how to respond in an emergency 🐎
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