In October 2019 we embarked on our most daring adventure yet: Taming 3 wild Kaimanawa stallions and traversing the length of New Zealand.

Our Journey So Far

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KM on horseback
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Days on the Trail
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Nights in tent

Our Mission

In October 2019, we will be traversing the length of New Zealand on horseback, accompanied and guided by our team of recently-tamed, wild Kaimanawa horses. Starting at the Bluff, we will ride through both islands to conclude our journey in Cape Reinga, taking an estimated eight months to complete. 

Through this ride, we aspire to both share and protect New Zealand’s wild spaces, whilst connecting people through nature and inspiring others to embrace a rewilding journey of their own.

In conjunction with our journey, we are also developing our humanandhorse.co.nz platform to connect New Zealand’s equestrian community and develop the equine industry in NZ. Throughout our journey, we will be documenting and advocating for horse-friendly trails / routes throughout the country as well as providing a platform to access information to riders looking to get out and explore. 

 

 

“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity”


– John Muir

Follow our Journey

Our story begins four years ago, amongst the snowgum-covered hills of the Australian High Country, retracing the hoofprints of the iconic “Man from Snowy River” movies on horseback. Although we come from very different backgrounds – Jess in forensic anthropology and Bijmin in digital media, our love for horses and exploring the untamed spaces on earth found us both abandoning the conventional 9-5 rat race in search of a more authentic and fulfilling lifestyle. It was during our time here at Watsons Trail Rides that our separate journeys intertwined and a passion for sharing the wild places around us was ignited. Since then we’ve been travelling the world, finding magical places that help us connect both with nature and with ourselves, alongside the best teachers we’ve ever come across: Horses.

Our journey has taken us through the most remote wilderness area in the lower 48 states, guiding 6 day unsupported pack-trips with Yellowstone WIlderness Outfitters alongside the bison, bears and wolves that call these woods and open plains their home. It has taken us to the Tapapa cliffs and rolling green hills of New Zealand’s North Island with River Valley Stables – teaching others how to connect with horses, and themselves, through natural horsemanship. Finally, our journey has taken us to the rugged alpine, glacially-carved valleys of New Zealand’s South Island, swimming horses in crystal clear glacial fed pools and exploring ancient native beech forests with a focus on sharing the transformative power of being immersed in nature with everyone who has joined us for this spectacular 5 day ride with High Country Horses.

Each experience has taught us a unique way to interact with and appreciate the treasures of the natural world and how important it is to share and protect those spaces for future generations. 

Our Story

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"Some days are spent on top of the world while other days the mountain looms high above us. Neither place is superior to the other as each provides its own unique perspective, challenge and story." - Jess

These photos were taken along Fowlers Pass in St. James Conservation area on one of our "day rides" out from Stanley Vale Hut. After switch backing our way up a formed track we split off and went cross-country in search of the infamous shingle slide that Mr. Fowler took a horse drawn wagon sliding down the face of many many moons ago. Given no other option to descend, he hitched one horse to the front and four to the back for brakes and slid the entire team down the loose shingle mountain face. Needless to say, its not a place I would take a pack pony, let alone a carriage... but they all made it down to tell the tale!

Such a great story of perseverance and determination and possibly, an example of when being at the top of the mountain is less ideal than being at the bottom.

Looking through photos I realized that for each mountain pass we rode, we have a photo taken from the bottom looking up in anticipation and excitement as well as a photo taken from the top, full of exhilaration and a sense of achievement. Neither photo held a negative perspective. Sometime I have to remind myself to carry this knowledge into the rest of my life. Just because the mountain looms high doesn't mean it is a bad view. To summit a peak you must begin by looking up at it first.

-Jess
... See MoreSee Less

Some days are spent on top of the world while other days the mountain looms high above us. Neither place is superior to the other as each provides its own unique perspective, challenge and story. - Jess  These photos were taken along Fowlers Pass in St. James Conservation area on one of our day rides out from Stanley Vale Hut. After switch backing our way up a formed track we split off and went cross-country in search of the infamous shingle slide that Mr. Fowler took a horse drawn wagon sliding down the face of many many moons ago.  Given no other option to descend, he hitched one horse to the front and four to the back for brakes and slid the entire team down the loose shingle mountain face. Needless to say, its not a place I would take a pack pony, let alone a carriage... but they all made it down to tell the tale!  Such a great story of perseverance and determination and possibly, an example of when being at the top of the mountain is less ideal than being at the bottom.  Looking through photos I realized that for each mountain pass we rode, we have a photo taken from the bottom looking up in anticipation and excitement as well as a photo taken from the top, full of exhilaration and a sense of achievement. Neither photo held a negative perspective. Sometime I have to remind myself to carry this knowledge into the rest of my life. Just because the mountain looms high doesnt mean it is a bad view. To summit a peak you must begin by looking up at it first.  -Jess

Comment on Facebook 2053050204929827_2644549759113199

Great to hear from you guys, do you have any idea when you are able to continue on your great adventure.

Been over Fowler’s once, don’t think I could do the scree slope 🙈 Love the St James. Hopefully one day I’ll make it back!

Been over twice on horse treks years ago Amazing story Thankyou

We saw your tracks, looks impossibly steep from below, great to get a close up picture

Nicely said Jess👍 What an amazing landscape

Thanks Jess, great reminder of perspective.

Oh my.....what a story. Great advice right there.

Gotta do that shingle slide

When you went up from Fowler's carpark and had reached the summit, did you then go to the left or to the right?

Great perspective jess 🤗

Love that quote!

Climbing the mountain isn’t easy but it is challenging in both its successes and failures as you approach the summit. But it’s the down slope slide that will determine whether or not you learned anything from the climb.

Love this did Fowlers pass just before lockdown and looked at the scree slope in awe of the wagon coming down it!

Claire Bear

Beautifully thought out and expressed here, Jess. So many life lessons from your journey!

Chris Cairney

Catherine Ballinger read this <3

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Jessie and her Tokala-Fox coming back from an afternoon play. The autumn colors are absolutely beautiful at the moment and with what could be Summer sunshine to accentuate their glow, Golden Bay has truly lived up to her name. ... See MoreSee Less

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The autumn colours are so amazing

Isnt it great to be in the saddle again 🥰

Gee he walks fast.

Rewild Trail Food! What's yummy?

**long post

Food on the trail. A few people have inquired about what we eat on this adventure, so I have written a post about our dietary habits out on the trail. I must say, it is a bit of an art to maintain a healthy, balanced diet when on the trail for months at a time when you can't carry anything that will spoil, anything that is heavy, anything that is fresh or anything that is a combination of the three. Nutrition has always been important to me, but it has become even more so recently with my increased interest in lifestyle health/wellness and disease prevention. Having studied on my own and in school, the direct effect that our diet has on our physical and mental health (and of course the health of our microbiome!), maintaining even a glimmer of balance while on the trail is essential to me. We push our bodies and minds to their limits many days and thus, over the months it is of the utmost importance that we fuel our bodies well so that we can keep performing the challenging tasks we face each day. Combined with our pack weight carrying limitations, our budget and our inability to keep things cold for very long, this endeavour is by no means a small task...

In the paragraphs below I have outlined our general meal plan along with how we prepare food whilst on the trail. We would also love to hear how others approach trail nutrition and/or any suggestions/ ideas/ personal trail hacks people have about the topic!

What's our cooking and consuming setup?

Cooking/ Water Boiling: We have two options for boiling water and cooking meals, both of which are useful in their own right. Whenever possible, we use our firebox as wood is a free fuel, but when we can't make fires (mainly because of fire ban), we have a little burner that screws right onto the top of a butane canister. The firebox has become my favorite camp tool and it puts a whole different spin on campfire cooking. It is a small, lightweight metal box that breaks down and stores flat with an opening on one side and air vents along the sides. It requires fairly constant attention as it must be continuously feed small sticks, but alternatively, large sticks can be used and fed in through the front hole as the wood inside the box burns up. I love cooking dinners on this because it is interactive and engaging, however, building and babying a fire at 5 am to make morning coffee is rather low on my list... This is where the butane burner option shines bright. The burner itself weighs only a few ounces and boils water in just a few minutes. This keeps us both (okay mostly me) sane on our early morning starts.

We keep our utensils very simple as cooking out here doesn't require much. We carry two pots (one small one large), two origami bowls, 2 spoons/forks and 2 cups. For cleaning we have a steel "sponge" and a small container of soap. Our entire cookware setup fits into my helmet bag. We store our food in simple grocery store freezer bags and keep them zipped and in the paniers (the bags that go on the pack saddle) at night to deter any rodent friends from having a feast.

Now that you know how we eat, let’s dive into what we eat!

Breakfast:

Coffee: Of Course. First thing. I do use milk powder and have finally figured out a way of preparing it so that it tastes mostly acceptable, on back country standards of course. The key is to mix it with the coffee first with cold water before adding the hot water so that it stays creamy and doesn't separate.

Overnight Chia/Oat Pots: I soak oats and chia seeds overnight with cinnamon, salt, milk powder and some sort of dried fruit, usually dates and/or apricots. Occasionally I stir in some peanut butter or chocolate protein powder, especially if it looks like it's going to be a big day. Chia seeds pack a massive nutritional punch with antioxidants (more by weight than blueberries), protein (more than soybeans) and omega 3,6 and 9, putting them top of my list for must haves in my morning ritual. Cinnamon is great for immunity and for digestion and the fruit is great for life.

Bread:

We make our own bread on the trail and absolutely love it! it is so simple to make the dough in the morning, let it rise in a pot in my saddle bag for the day and bake it at night. We made a simple herb loaf with lots of garlic, rosemary and thyme and it is near irresistible. We use our two cooking pots to create an oven with the small one inside the big. We put a few rocks at the bottom to keep it separated and stop the bottom of the bread from burning and place it on top of our firebox to bake. We place a few coals on top of the pot to create equal heat and the bread cooks in about 20 minutes.

Snacks:

We always have some variety of Scroggin (trail mix) and I prepare a little baggie for each of us in the morning. I change up what kind I buy at each resupply so that we have variety, but it really depends on the store options and their price tags. A lot of the places we resupply are tiny little stores and good quality nuts and seeds are often not available or cost an arm and a leg, so it can range from just peanuts, to nut mixes to baja mix, to whatever I can find that is the least processed and the healthiest. We each carry a bar of some sort and a backup bar in our backpacks in case the day becomes longer than expected. There are some great date bars and nut bars as well as meal replacement bars that are on the healthier side and lower in sugar/additives. Jerky is a Bijmin favorite and we often splurge on a bag or two for our longer remote outings. I buy a few apples and we always eat them within the first day or two as they are heavy, but fresh fruit is such a nice treat on the trail.

Lunch:

Lunch is pretty much always a wrap including a protein, cheese, red capsicum, cucumber and mustard. We have discovered a really cool brand of wraps which make hemp wraps and cricket flour wraps (yes as in the insect!) both of which taste delicious and are extremely high in protein. We either have salami, canned tuna/salmon or occasionally PB&J as filling with any hard(er) cheese we can source, usually Edam or Cheddar. When weight allows, we add sauerkraut which is a really nice change. It is also great for your microbiome as well!

Afternoon Pick-me-Up:

A backpacker blog recommended cup of soup packets for a quick snack upon arriving at camp and we really like the idea. Usually while Bijmin sets up the "house", I boil up a soup packet with a bit of orzo or couscous in it. I often add some herbs, olive oil, seaweed and lots of garlic in as well. It's even good on hot days, not that we have had all too many of them.... and even better on the cold and rainy ones!

Dinner:

Dinner is our most varying meal and is often whatever we can source that fits our requirements at the store we are resupplying at.

The first few days: The first few days of each resupply are our "splurge days." Sometimes that includes bacon and eggs, burgers, sausages and mash and even an occasional steak! We always have a few fresh veggies as well. Broccoli, cabbage, and aubergine (eggplant) are a few of our go-to options that last well and don't get bruised in the paniers.

Midweek Options: We have gotten quite creative! We make pasta with sauce, made with cheese, coconut milk (comes in powder form), garlic and herbs. We add in salami, corn beef, seaweed or veggies if we have them as well. Another great option is curry with rice. A lot of the authentic indian curry packets have absolutely no preservatives and are made entirely of just spices, lentils and chickpeas. They are a fantastic fast option, and in a pinch would not even need to be heated. We also carry hearty dried soup packs that are full of split grains, barley and peas and lentils, veggies and some sort of protein. These soups are great for when we can use the firebox as they do have to simmer for a while. Gnocchi, Risottos, and falafel ( comes as a dried mix) are a few others that often make our list!

Freeze Dried: We always have them, but only use them on long remote stretches (more than 10 days) and we consume them last as they are the lightest meals we carry. We usually have four to six of them that live in our backpacks. This is a safety measure as well in case something happened to our packhorse, light meals always live on our backs. They are extremely lightweight, good quality meals with veggies, meats with some sort of carb. They are not cheap though (12-17 dollars a meal), and can only be found at large supermarkets, so we save them for when we have to pack for eight days or more. They are best when they are simmered for a while instead of just adding boiling water and waiting as the package instructs. We love the gourmet backcountry meals in particular and haven't found a flavour we haven't approved of yet. The beef bourguignon is our favorite with the lamb risotto and tandoori chicken for close seconds. We don't find the portion sizes big enough though (even the 2 serving ones) so we always have a spare carb to bulk them out, either rice packets (brown and quinoa blends when possible) or potato flakes, which we make into mash.

Dessert: I am a girl that loves her chocolate fix.... so we always have a bar with us, usually dark as I like it better and I can also convince myself that it is my healthy dose of antioxidants for the day! Sometimes I have it with peanut butter as well because the combination is my absolute weakness.... Once in a while we switch it up and have a chocolate or vanilla pudding or custard if we are feeling really fancy.

Supplements/Other:

I have a daily green powder mixed with water which helps me feel like I'm at least getting some sort of veggie in me. I also take fruit and veggie capsules, tumeric tablets and magnesium as I have found these supplements help me the most. We also always carry spare protein powder that can be added to meals to bulk them out or made into a shake and had as a meal on its own.

For the Ladies in the group: I did find that I really had to watch my iron levels on the trail at certain times of the month. Without much red meat or veggies rich in iron (spinach does not survive a pack pony...) in my diet, it is the first time I've felt the effects of low iron and it is an absolute energy kicker! I had to start scheduling in iron high meals (hence the steak) to keep myself on track.

I really enjoy the meal planning and preparation part of the Rewild Project. It is quite the science to buy exactly what you need for each week, no more and no less. Each ingredient is calculated and when done correctly, there is nothing extraneous left over at the end of the week.

I hope you have found this interesting and informative! We are always looking for new tips and tricks. Feel free to share your own trail food favorites and back country hacks in the comments below!

*As I searched our photos for food, I realized that only the special meals made the photography cut! I'll post some more of the less glamorous meals if I can fine any!

-Jess
... See MoreSee Less

Rewild Trail Food! Whats yummy?  **long post  Food on the trail. A few people have inquired about what we eat on this adventure, so I have written a post about our dietary habits out on the trail. I must say, it is a bit of an art to maintain a healthy, balanced diet when on the trail for months at a time when you cant carry anything that will spoil, anything that is heavy, anything that is fresh or anything that is a combination of the three. Nutrition has always been important to me, but it has become even more so recently with my increased interest in lifestyle health/wellness and disease prevention. Having studied on my own and in school, the direct effect that our diet has on our physical and mental health (and of course the health of our microbiome!), maintaining even a glimmer of balance while on the trail is essential to me. We push our bodies and minds to their limits many days and thus, over the months it is of the utmost importance that we fuel our bodies well so that we can keep performing the challenging tasks we face each day. Combined with our pack weight carrying limitations, our budget and our inability to keep things cold for very long, this endeavour is by no means a small task...  In the paragraphs below I have outlined our general meal plan along with how we prepare food whilst on the trail. We would also love to hear how others approach trail nutrition and/or any suggestions/ ideas/ personal trail hacks people have about the topic!  Whats our cooking and consuming setup?  Cooking/ Water Boiling: We have two options for boiling water and cooking meals, both of which are useful in their own right. Whenever possible, we use our firebox as wood is a free fuel, but when we cant make fires (mainly because of fire ban), we have a little burner that screws right onto the top of a butane canister. The firebox has become my favorite camp tool and it puts a whole different spin on campfire cooking. It is a small, lightweight metal box that breaks down and stores flat with an opening on one side and air vents along the sides. It requires fairly constant attention as it must be continuously feed small sticks, but alternatively, large sticks can be used and fed in through the front hole as the wood inside the box burns up. I love cooking dinners on this because it is interactive and engaging, however, building and babying a fire at 5 am to make morning coffee is rather low on my list... This is where the butane burner option shines bright. The burner itself weighs only a few ounces and boils water in just a few minutes. This keeps us both (okay mostly me) sane on our early morning starts.  We keep our utensils very simple as cooking out here doesnt require much. We carry two pots (one small one large), two origami bowls, 2 spoons/forks and 2 cups. For cleaning we have a steel sponge and a small container of soap. Our entire cookware setup fits into my helmet bag. We store our food in simple grocery store freezer bags and keep them zipped and in the paniers (the bags that go on the pack saddle) at night to deter any rodent friends from having a feast.  Now that you know how we eat, let’s dive into what we eat!  Breakfast:  Coffee: Of Course. First thing. I do use milk powder and have finally figured out a way of preparing it so that it tastes mostly acceptable, on back country standards of course. The key is to mix it with the coffee first with cold water before adding the hot water so that it stays creamy and doesnt separate.  Overnight Chia/Oat Pots: I soak oats and chia seeds overnight with cinnamon, salt, milk powder and some sort of dried fruit, usually dates and/or apricots. Occasionally I stir in some peanut butter or chocolate protein powder, especially if it looks like its going to be a big day. Chia seeds pack a massive nutritional punch with antioxidants (more by weight than blueberries), protein (more than soybeans) and omega 3,6 and 9, putting them top of my list for must haves in my morning ritual. Cinnamon is great for immunity and for digestion and the fruit is great for life.  Bread:  We make our own bread on the trail and absolutely love it! it is so simple to make the dough in the morning, let it rise in a pot in my saddle bag for the day and bake it at night. We made a simple herb loaf with lots of garlic, rosemary and thyme and it is near irresistible. We use our two cooking pots to create an oven with the small one inside the big. We put a few rocks at the bottom to keep it separated and stop the bottom of the bread from burning and place it on top of our firebox to bake. We place a few coals on top of the pot to create equal heat and the bread cooks in about 20 minutes.  Snacks:  We always have some variety of Scroggin (trail mix) and I prepare a little baggie for each of us in the morning. I change up what kind I buy at each resupply so that we have variety, but it really depends on the store options and their price tags. A lot of the places we resupply are tiny little stores and good quality nuts and seeds are often not available or cost an arm and a leg, so it can range from just peanuts, to nut mixes to baja mix, to whatever I can find that is the least processed and the healthiest. We each carry a bar of some sort and a backup bar in our backpacks in case the day becomes longer than expected. There are some great date bars and nut bars as well as meal replacement bars that are on the healthier side and lower in sugar/additives. Jerky is a Bijmin favorite and we often splurge on a bag or two for our longer remote outings. I buy a few apples and we always eat them within the first day or two as they are heavy, but fresh fruit is such a nice treat on the trail.  Lunch:  Lunch is pretty much always a wrap including a protein, cheese, red capsicum, cucumber and mustard. We have discovered a really cool brand of wraps  which make hemp wraps and cricket flour wraps (yes as in the insect!) both of which taste delicious and are extremely high in protein. We either have salami, canned tuna/salmon or occasionally PB&J as filling with any hard(er) cheese we can source, usually Edam or Cheddar. When weight allows, we add sauerkraut which is a really nice change. It is also great for your microbiome as well!  Afternoon Pick-me-Up:  A backpacker blog recommended cup of soup packets for a quick snack upon arriving at camp and we really like the idea. Usually while Bijmin sets up the house, I boil up a soup packet with a bit of orzo or couscous in it. I often add some herbs, olive oil, seaweed and lots of garlic in as well. Its even good on hot days, not that we have had all too many of them.... and even better on the cold and rainy ones!  Dinner:  Dinner is our most varying meal and is often whatever we can source that fits our requirements at the store we are resupplying at.  The first few days: The first few days of each resupply are our splurge days.  Sometimes that includes bacon and eggs, burgers, sausages and mash and even an occasional steak! We always have a few fresh veggies as well. Broccoli, cabbage,  and aubergine (eggplant) are a few of our go-to options that last well and dont get bruised in the paniers.  Midweek Options: We have gotten quite creative! We make pasta with sauce, made with cheese, coconut milk (comes in powder form), garlic and herbs. We add in salami, corn beef, seaweed or veggies if we have them as well. Another great option is curry with rice. A lot of the authentic indian curry packets have absolutely no preservatives and are made entirely of just spices, lentils and chickpeas. They are a fantastic fast option, and in a pinch would not even need to be heated. We also carry hearty dried soup packs that are full of split grains, barley and peas and lentils, veggies and some sort of protein. These soups are great for when we can use the firebox as they do have to simmer for a while. Gnocchi, Risottos, and falafel ( comes as a dried mix) are a few others that often make our list!  Freeze Dried: We always have them, but only use them on long remote stretches (more than 10 days) and we consume them last as they are the lightest meals we carry. We usually have four to six of them that live in our backpacks. This is a safety measure as well in case something happened to our packhorse, light meals always live on our backs. They are extremely lightweight, good quality meals with veggies, meats with some sort of carb. They are not cheap though (12-17 dollars a meal), and can only be found at large supermarkets, so we save them for when we have to pack for eight days or more. They are best when they are simmered for a while instead of just adding boiling water and waiting as the package instructs. We love the gourmet backcountry meals in particular and havent found a flavour we havent approved of yet. The beef bourguignon is our favorite with the lamb risotto and tandoori chicken for close seconds. We dont find the portion sizes big enough though (even the 2 serving ones) so we always have a spare carb to bulk them out, either rice packets (brown and quinoa blends when possible) or potato flakes, which we make into mash.  Dessert: I am a girl that loves her chocolate fix....  so we always have a bar with us, usually dark as I like it better and I can also convince myself that it is my healthy dose of antioxidants for the day! Sometimes I have it with peanut butter as well because the combination is my absolute weakness.... Once in a while we switch it up and have a chocolate or vanilla pudding or custard if we are feeling really fancy.  Supplements/Other:  I have a daily green powder mixed with water which helps me feel like Im at least getting some sort of veggie in me. I also take fruit and veggie capsules, tumeric tablets and magnesium as I have found these supplements help me the most. We also always carry spare protein powder that can be added to meals to bulk them out or made into a shake and had as a meal on its own.  For the Ladies in the group: I did find that I really had to watch my iron levels on the trail at certain times of the month. Without much red meat or veggies rich in iron (spinach does not survive a pack pony...)  in my diet, it is the first time Ive felt the effects of low iron and it is an absolute energy kicker! I had to start scheduling in iron high meals (hence the steak) to keep myself on track.  I really enjoy the meal planning and preparation part of the Rewild Project. It is quite the science to buy exactly what you need for each week, no more and no less. Each ingredient is calculated and when done correctly, there is nothing extraneous left over at the end of the week.  I hope you have found this interesting and informative! We are always looking for new tips and tricks. Feel free to share your own trail food favorites and back country hacks in the comments below!  *As I searched our photos for food, I realized that only the special meals made the photography cut! Ill post some more of the less glamorous meals if I can fine any!  -Jess

Comment on Facebook 2053050204929827_2625079977726844

Wow, you really do have it down to a fine art xx

The cooking part is where I would fail I’m sure 🥴 Well thought out process, you are very clever & also much skinnier 😁

Woah I LOVED reading all that. Have been trying to figure out how & what you would eat. Right down to the shopping for items, method of cooking & the nutritional side of what you buy to keep you healthy. I so hope you write a book someday. I will be the first to purchase it if it does get published. How does one contribute funds to help you with your next food purchases? Is there a give-a-little page or an account to donate to?

Yum makes me hungry for the trail. Tinfoil dinners are great when you have fresh food. Onions,red pepper,zuccini,peas,grated carrot... Mix in olive oil, garlic powder, herbs of your choice, salt&pepper. Wrap portions in tinfoil. Cook on fire or in pan

Impressive nutrition, such luxuries you can have with a pack horse! Condensed milk in a tube goes well in a coffee if you don't mind the sugar, and it's an old tramping trick to have a tube handy as emergency energy food, squeezed straight in your mouth. I've never been game/desperate enough to try that though. As far as foraging mushrooms goes, as long as they are out in the open amongst grass (field mushrooms) they should be safe. Just one time we got excited, picked too many, cooked them all and got a crook tummy. Everything in moderation 😆

Great post! I like the things you are doing. (ESP the bread of course!)I have never backpacked or horse camped for really long periods but in my sailboat days I liked having some root vegetables like beets, potatoes onions squash etc. which kept for long periods unrefrigerated, but might be too heavy for you. In my remote kayak camping days I liked to bring a lot of dried vegetables to add to the food we cooked to bulk it up and add fiber and nutrition. I especially like dried mushrooms, dried tomatoes, carrots, onions zucchini. I dried a lot of things myself. I suppose these things would be hard to come by mostly tho at this point in your trip. Thanks for sharing!

Wow! Your bread looks fabulous, and you do, too. Meals look good. Sounds like you have it all down to a science. Happy trails, to you both.

Thank you for sharing, looks like you got it well sussed 🙂 How you make capsicum and cucumber last past 3 days (when hot) is a mystery to me, something fresh for lunches is the biggest challenge I reckon. Red onion and alfalfa sprouts (grown in a bag) are the only things we came up with.

Thank you so much for taking the time to write such an informative, wonderful post. It is much appreciated ‼️

That was so very interesting to read. Thankyou for taking the time to share it with us all.

Thank you for sharing Jess! I just LOVE your stories! Be safe 😘

Wow, that was fascinating and impressive!! You and Bijmin always made everything tasty!! Love you both!! Take care, stay healthy! 😘

Looks really organic & Devine. I love that's its served on a stone.

You are amazing ❤️ Thanks for sharing

This is great Jess. I was wondering what you two were surviving on out there. I love that you bake bread. That’s amazing.

Thanks... I was wondering what you guys were doing for meals.... Now... as for toilet paper...?????😱😂

Wow! Do you forage at all? Mushrooms, greens? Fish? And wondering do you have to carry much water or generally able to find it?

Great ! So much information. U do a wonderful job of co-ordinating it all so u can live like that. Well done 😀👍

Very interesting read, you should include this in your book. Thanks for sharing.

This was a great read Jess. Sounds like you have everything down to a fine art!

This is such great info, thank you! ❤

Fascinating Jess - bread making on the trail - fantastic!!

Enjoyed the read. Thanks! Glad you are doing well.

Thank you very interesting read!

I miss you so so much Jess Mullins

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So lucky to have places like this in our lockdown bubble to explore. Cooling off in the river after a lovely walk exploring our backyard. ... See MoreSee Less

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I bet that's cold water? But looks absolutely gorgeous.

That looks like heaven!

Looks balmy! I’ll be dreaming of days like this while I’m all rugged up 🧣🧤❄️

It looks amazing

Glad you didn't have to go home to US Jess

It would be lovely but freezing

Are you still in lock down or are you on the move again?

Where do you guys live?

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Our Horses

In April 2018 we adopted 3 wild Kaimanawa stallions from the annual KHH muster. From the moment Tokala, Madiba and Kaewa stepped off the truck our lives were forever changed.

Although our journey together is just beginning, theirs began a long time ago. These horses are born and raised free spirits of the Kaimanawa ranges; the rolling hills that gave them their name. They spend their days roaming the hills in natural herd groups, existing in harmony with the land around them. These wild animals embody what nature intended for the horse. Over years of survival, the hills have sculpted them into strong hardy animals, with coats to withstand the elements, hooves conditioned to the rough and rocky terrain, and a fiery soul that runs freely through their veins.

Click on any of the profiles below to find out more about each horse and updates with where they’re at. 

Adventure Journal

Madiba the kaimanawa horse
Madiba

Madiba

Madiba (Dibs) is the little joker of the group. This little horse has been one of our most challenging so far but loves cuddles.

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